Who Can Be Held Liable For A Construction Site Electrocution?

Who Can Be Held Liable For A Construction Site Electrocution?

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Construction sites are often very dangerous for workers and other individuals around the site. Workplace accidents causing injuries can happen in the blink of an eye. One of the most severe types of accidents on construction sites is electrocution shock. When an electrocution shock happens, it can result in extremely serious internal injuries or even death. Most construction site electrocution accidents are preventable when the proper safety measures are in place and followed. When someone is electrocuted, it is often because someone else didn’t take the appropriate steps to ensure the safety of others. In those cases, the injured party may file a claim against the responsible parties and recover compensation for their injuries.

What Are The Common Types Of Electrocution Injuries?

Many of the tasks performed on construction sites require electricity, from using power tools to lighting to operating other utilities. Every power source is a potential hazard that could electrocute someone. If that happens, the person may suffer injuries ranging from superficial to life-threatening. Typically, electrocution injuries are broken down into low-voltage (up to 500V) and high-voltage (500V – 1000V), and there are four types of electrocution injuries possible:

  • Burns
  • Electrical shock
  • Fatal electrocution
  • Falls that happen as a result of electrical energy

Minor injuries might include superficial burns to the skin, while more severe electrocution injuries may cause internal burns as the electrical current flows through the body. There may be severe damage to body tissues, muscles, or nerves and burns at the entry and exit points of the current.

Additionally, electrocution can cause unconsciousness and cardiac arrest. In some cases, if CPR is performed quickly, an individual may be revived before brain damage occurs. Unfortunately, brain damage or death is likely if the electrocution is extreme or if resuscitation isn’t attempted swiftly enough.

Who Is Responsible For Construction Site Electrocution Injuries?

When someone suffers injuries from a construction site electrocution through no fault of their own, they may be able to sue for a financial recovery for damages from the responsible parties. Determining those responsible depends on the circumstances surrounding the specific incident.

Generally speaking, when a worker gets hurt on the job in Pennsylvania, workers’ compensation laws prevent the individual from filing a claim against the employer. The workers’ compensation program operates on a “no-fault” system, which means that employees who are injured at work do not have to prove negligence on the part of their employers to receive benefits. Rather, being injured at work entitles employees to subsidized medical treatment and a partial replacement of lost wages. But, receiving benefits means that injured employees give up the right to file lawsuits against their employers.

Still, there are some options for filing a legal claim when the negligence of a third party can be proven. For example, if a construction site electrocution is caused by a defective product, the manufacturer or others in the supply chain may be found liable and ordered to pay compensation to the injured worker.

The premises owner where the construction site is located may also be held liable for electrocution injuries if it is proven that the owner didn’t properly maintain the worksite. Proof that the property owner didn’t meet safety standards (local, state, or federal) will help establish a case involving negligence. Additionally, if the owner had a duty to warn workers and visitors about a hazardous condition but failed to do it, it may be cause for a premises liability claim.

Every worksite is unique, with employees, contractors, vendors, visitors, and others. It may be challenging to determine who to hold liable in the event of an electrocution accident. That’s why it is important to meet with an experienced personal injury attorney to review the case and identify if and when the negligence occurred.  

Contact Philadelphia Personal Injury Lawyers At Ross Feller Casey Today

Suppose you or your loved one has sustained severe injuries due to an electrocution accident at a construction site. In that case, you must find a workplace injury lawyer to represent your interests. Electrocution injuries are typically severe, resulting in a range of medical conditions that may be long-lasting. You may be experiencing mounting medical bills, lost wages, and other related expenses. It can be very taxing for you and your family.

At Ross Feller Casey, we represent clients who have been injured in electrical accidents at construction sites. We have a team of qualified attorneys and medical doctors on staff to review your case and determine if you have a valid claim. We will thoroughly examine the details of your case to discover who may be responsible for your injuries.  

Our team is ready to help you ease the financial burdens caused by your injuries. There’s no cost to you until your case is settled or won in the courtroom. Contact us today for your free consultation.

Disclaimer: Ross Feller Casey, LLP provides legal advice only after an attorney-client relationship is formed. Our website is an introduction to the firm and does not create a relationship between our attorneys and clients. An attorney-client relationship is formed only after a written agreement is signed by the client and the firm. Because every case is unique, the description of awards and summary of cases successfully handled are not intended to imply or guarantee that same success in other cases. Ross Feller Casey, LLP represents catastrophically injured persons and their families in injury and wrongful death cases, providing legal representation in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.