Child Sexual Abuse

Child Sexual Abuse

In litigation that drew worldwide attention, Ross Feller Casey successfully represented seven victims in the Jerry Sandusky / Penn State Child Sexual Abuse scandal

As the firm with the largest number of clients, Ross Feller Casey played an integral role in finalizing a global $59.7 million settlement package with Penn State.

While the individual settlement amounts remain confidential, Penn State confirmed that after lengthy negotiations with founding partners Joel Feller and Matt Casey, several of the firm's clients were placed in the top monetary category of the 31 claims against the university.

Ross Feller Casey represented the men identified as Victim 2, Victim 3, Victim 7 and Victim 10 and Sandusky's adopted son, Matt Sandusky, as well as two others.

In October 2013, as the university confirmed the settlement totals with 26 young men, Casey was interviewed by CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley.

Casey told the national CBS broadcast that the settlements represent "a remarkable achievement by courageous young men." (see video to the left)

As the settlements were being finalized in mid August 2013, Feller and his client, Victim 10, gave an exclusive interview with Philadelphia's ABC Affiliate, WPVI-TV.

 

Ross Feller Casey's involvement in the case dates back to 2011. When the scandal broke, local and national media quickly sought out Casey and Feller as the leading legal experts on child abuse cases. The Harrisburg Patriot-News, which broke the child sex abuse story and won a Pulitzer Prize for its coverage, called Casey "one of Pennsylvania's leading civil attorneys."

Sandusky, a former assistant football coach, was convicted June 22, 2012 of 45 counts of sexual abuse against 10 boys, and top Penn State administrators are facing criminal charges for allegedly lying to authorities.

As Sandusky's October 2012 sentencing approached, three major Pennsylvania newspapers published a profile of Casey and Feller describing them as "two of the most prominent personal injury attorneys" in Philadelphia and noting that they represent more of Sandusky's victims than any other firm (read the story here).

On the eve of the Sandusky verdict, Joel Feller and Matt Casey tell WNEP-16 outside the Centre County Courthouse that their clients are "all courageous" and "are optimistic that the jury is going to return a guilty verdict."

 

Joel Feller tells 6ABC-TV hours after the verdict that his clients in the Sandusky case "are just thrilled that nobody else will have to endure what they had to endure."

 

Matt Casey tells CBS3-TV that his clients courageously faced down their abuser in court and are "jubilant" with the verdict knowing that Sandusky "is not going to get the opportunity to do this to any other children."

 

Matt Casey tells CBS3-TV that civil lawsuits are pending in the Sandusky case. His clients, and all the Sandusky victims, "were let down by a whole lot of people, and our primary job at this point is to find out who let them down."

 

On July 12, 2012, when the long-awaiting investigative report on how Penn State failed to prevent the sexual abuse was released, news outlets from across the nation and oversees again turned to Feller and Casey for reaction.

They were quoted extensively in national newspapers, such as USA Today, and appeared on numerous TV and radio broadcasts from NPR's All Things Considered to WITF's Radio Smart Talk program to the BBC News.

On the heels of the Freeh Report, Matt Casey told CBS-3 Philadelphia: "This was a huge failing that was caused by men who were trying to protect their jobs and the brand and the power and the money of Penn State."

 

Matt Casey tells WGAL-8 Harrisburg that civil suits will bring out more details than the Freeh Report was able to uncover: "Jerry Sandusky didn't just become a pedophile in 1998."

 

Moments after former FBI Director wrapped up his press conference, Matt Casey told WNEP-16 Scranton that "The case after today is no longer simply of negligence. It is one of out-and-out recklessness" on the behalf of Penn State.

 

On July 23, 2012, the NCAA, college athletics governing body, announced major sanctions against Penn State for the university's handling of the Sandusky matter, including a $60 million fine and a four-year ban from bowl appearances. Casey and Feller were interviewed by TV, radio and print reporters in the shadows of Penn State's Beaver Stadium soon after the announcement.

Matt Casey tells NBC-10 that "nothing that the NCAA does can undo what has happened" to the victims.

 

Joel Feller tells CBS-3 that, for the victims, the NCAA sanctions are "certainly not closure."

 

Joel Feller tells CBS-21 the victims now are "faced with the reality that the horror that they suffered could have and should have been prevented."

 

Matt Casey tells ABC-27 that "what is warranted here is not simply remedial action or compensatory fines or damages but punitive damages."

 

Ross Feller Casey again made national news when it announced July 26, 2012 that it was representing Victim 2, the young man who as a child was sexually abused by Jerry Sandusky in the showers at Penn State.

The firm released a statement announcing it was planning to file a civil suit against Penn State and others. Casey and Feller also released two voicemails left by Sandusky for Victim 2 in September 2011 when Sandusky's arrest appeared imminent.

Learn more about the voicemails

Coverage of the announcement topped many TV broadcasts, including on CNN, and ran in numerous newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal and on the front pages of The Philadelphia Inquirer and The Legal Intelligencer.

WNEP-16 calls Ross Feller Casey's announcement regarding Victim 2 another "bombshell" in the Sandusky / Penn State child sexual abuse case.

On Oct. 9, 2012, Sandusky was sentenced to 30-to 60-years behind bars. Casey and Feller were inside the courtroom to hear Sandusky plead his innocence. Outside, the media again sought them out for reaction to what effectively was a life sentence for the 68 year old.

On The Today Show, Matt Casey tells NBC's National Investigative Correspondent Michael Isikoff that the "bottom line is (Sandusky's) going to spend his life in prison, there's no question about that."

 

Just moments after the sentence was handed down, Casey tells NBC10 in Philadelphia that Sandusky "is going to die in prison. He is never going to be able to do this to anybody else. That, probably, was the most important part of this for our clients."

 

Feller tells CBS3 in Philadelphia that Sandusky is a "psychopath" who "continues to victimize these courageous young men." Sandusky's comments at sentencing, added Casey, "came from the mouth of a man who is just deranged."

 

Ross Feller Casey handled the Sandusky cases as part of a legal team that also includes State College-area attorneys Andrew Shubin and Justine Andronici.

National estimates suggest that one in four girls and one in six boys will be sexually assaulted before they turn age 18. Often, they fall prey to people close to them and figures of authority.

The Sandusky scandal brings this fact home in all-too-vivid detail.

Philadelphia child abuse attorneys at Ross Feller Casey have successfully litigated a wide variety of child sexual abuse and related lawsuits.

Feller is currently litigating a case where physicians failed to report suspected abuse resulting in a young child suffering a devastating brain injury. He also successfully handled a case in which a young woman was raped outside a tavern.

Casey is litigating a case involving a crime that occurred on a Pennsylvania college campus where the institution failed to take proper action to remedy a dangerous condition.

He is also litigating a separate case involving a sexual assault and rape of a woman that occurred as a result of negligent oversight of a premises.

Contact us today for a free consultation from one of our child abuse attorneys in Philadelphia.

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