When Is Neuroendocrine Dysfunction A Brain Injury Lawsuit?

When Is Neuroendocrine Dysfunction A Brain Injury Lawsuit?

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Brain injuries result from trauma to the brain. They can be caused by external forces or impacts, like when a person is hit in the head by a baseball or when someone falls and hits their head on concrete. Brain injury can also result from whiplash, like when someone is involved in a car wreck, and their head quickly snaps forward and back. It can even happen due to a seemingly harmless jarring motion, like stepping off a curb wrong or falling but not hitting your head.

Brain injuries can also happen due to internal conditions. Events like stroke, exposure to toxins or chemicals like chemotherapy drugs or carbon monoxide, and infections like meningitis can result in brain injuries.

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are typically classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Concussions, which are usually considered mild, are the most common type of TBI. However, even a mild brain injury can cause severe, long-lasting symptoms, including hormone dysregulation.

Brain injuries can also happen due to internal conditions. Events like stroke, exposure to toxins or chemicals like chemotherapy drugs or carbon monoxide, and infections like meningitis can result in brain injuries.

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are typically classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Concussions, which are usually considered mild, are the most common type of TBI. However, even a mild brain injury can cause serious, long-lasting symptoms, including hormone dysregulation.

What Is Neuroendocrine Dysfunction?

In the endocrine system, some glands produce and release hormones into the body. These hormones control essential functions, like heart regulation and tissue and bone growth. When there is an imbalance of hormones, either too much or too little, being produced, it can cause serious issues.

Neuroendocrine dysfunction refers to multiple conditions that result from an imbalance in hormone production that involves a person's brain. There are two brain areas, the pituitary gland, and the hypothalamus, regulating hormone production. When these areas are damaged by a TBI, such as a rupture, brain swelling, or vascular damage, it affects the production of pituitary hormones and other neuroendocrine functions.

Abnormalities in the neuroendocrine system are commonly a result of traumatic brain injury. However, they can also be caused by milder injuries like concussions and more severe conditions like meningitis or other brain infections.

When the body is experiencing an imbalance of hormone levels, the symptoms might look like neurological conditions. That is why it's so important to seek the care of a knowledgeable doctor or another qualified medical professional to recognize neuroendocrine dysfunctions as soon as possible.

How Does Neuroendocrine Dysfunction Affect Individuals After TBI?

Neuroendocrine dysfunction resulting from a TBI affects the normal production and regulation of hormones created by the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. The most common hormone deficiencies involving TBI are:

  • Growth hormone deficiency – This condition includes symptoms like anxiety, depression, increased abdominal fat, decreased concentration, fatigue, impaired judgment, and dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol or fats in the blood).
  • Thyroid deficiency – The thyroid's role is to help the body to convert food into energy and heat and regulate body temperature. A deficiency of thyroid hormone can cause weight gain, muscle cramps, depression, decreased energy, fatigue, hypotension (low blood pressure), memory problems, cold intolerance, constipation, and changes to a person's skin, hair, and voice.
  • Adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency – This deficiency can cause fatigue, depression, anxiety, weight loss, loss of libido, anemia, myopathy (muscle disorder), hypoglycemia, and hyponatremia (insufficient level of sodium in the blood).
  • Prolactin deficiency – Deficiency of prolactin may result in decreased libido and impotence in men and amenorrhea (lack of menstrual period), galactorrhea (abnormal lactation), infertility, hot flashes, and vaginal dryness in women.
  • Gonadotropin deficiency – This condition is known to include symptoms like decreased muscle mass, decreased exercise tolerance, infertility, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, anemia, and testicular atrophy. In women, it includes breast atrophy, sexual dysfunction, and amenorrhea.

When Can TBI Victims With Neuroendocrine Dysfunction File A Lawsuit?

Endocrine dysfunction is relatively common after an individual suffers a TBI. However, since many of the symptoms of hormone deficiency present similarly to the somatic, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms experienced after a brain injury, endocrine dysfunction may be missed. In many cases, TBI victims are not adequately screened or tested for neuroendocrine dysfunction. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine dysfunction can affect an individual's overall rehabilitation and recovery from a TBI.

Additionally, insurance providers often try to minimize the need for screening for, testing, and treating neuroendocrine abnormalities. For insurance companies, it's usually an issue of cost that impacts how the condition is addressed. Consequently, these companies often prioritize profits over the importance of adequately treating traumatic brain injury victims.

When neuroendocrine abnormalities are misdiagnosed, or there is a delay in diagnosis or treatment, it may be a case of medical malpractice. It's crucial that a knowledgeable brain injury attorney review all medical records to determine whether a claim can be made.

Speak With An Experienced Pennsylvania Brain Injury Lawyer

Neuroendocrine dysfunction can leave individuals and their families facing numerous consequences, including medical, emotional, and financial difficulties. Suppose another party was responsible for causing an accident that led to your injuries, or your diagnosis was delayed or missed. In that case, it is essential to remember that you have the right to pursue compensation for your damages.

The attorneys at Ross Feller Casey have successfully litigated many brain injury lawsuits, winning large verdicts and settlements for our clients. We have the expertise and resources to help you, too.

Contact Ross Feller Casey today to schedule a free case evaluation. You won't pay a thing until your case is won or settled.

Disclaimer: Ross Feller Casey, LLP provides legal advice only after an attorney-client relationship is formed. Our website is an introduction to the firm and does not create a relationship between our attorneys and clients. An attorney-client relationship is formed only after a written agreement is signed by the client and the firm. Because every case is unique, the description of awards and summary of cases successfully handled are not intended to imply or guarantee that same success in other cases. Ross Feller Casey, LLP represents catastrophically injured persons and their families in injury and wrongful death cases, providing legal representation in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.